Prometheus Bound

Aeschylus

Aeschylus, creator; Aeschylus with an English translation Vol I. Smyth, Herbert Weir, 1857- 1937, editor, translator. Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann, Ltd.: 1922.

  1. Ah, you would hardly bear my agonies to whom it is not foredoomed to die; for death would have freed me from my sufferings.
  2. But now no limit to my tribulations has been appointed until Zeus is hurled from his sovereignty.
Io
  1. What! Shall Zeus one day be hurled from his dominion?
Prometheus
  1. You would rejoice, I think, to see that happen.
Io
  1. Why not, since it is at the hand of Zeus that I suffer?
Prometheus
  1. Then you may assure yourself that these things are true.
Io
  1. By whom shall he be despoiled of the sceptre of his sovereignty?
Prometheus
  1. By himself and his own empty-headed purposes.
Io
  1. In what way? Oh tell me, if there be no harm in telling.
Prometheus
  1. He shall make a marriage that shall one day cause him distress.
Io
  1. With a divinity or with a mortal? If it may be told, speak out.
Prometheus
  1. Why ask with whom? I may not speak of this.
Io
  1. Is it by his consort that he shall be dethroned?
Prometheus
  1. Yes, since she shall bear a son mightier than his father.
Io
  1. And has he no means to avert this doom?
Prometheus
  1. No, none—except me, if I were released from bondage.
Io
  1. Who then is to release you against the will of Zeus?
Prometheus
  1. It is to be one of your own grandchildren.
Io
  1. What did you say? A child of mine will release you from your misery?
Prometheus
  1. The third in descent after ten generations.