Prometheus Bound

Aeschylus

Aeschylus, creator; Aeschylus with an English translation Vol I. Smyth, Herbert Weir, 1857- 1937, editor, translator. Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann, Ltd.: 1922.

  1. Hurry then to cast the fetters about him, so that the Father does not see you loitering.
Hephaestus
  1. Well, there then! The bands are ready, as you may see.
Power
  1. Cast them about his wrists and with might strike with your hammer; rivet him to the rocks.
Hephaestus
  1. There! The work is getting done and not improperly.
Power
  1. Strike harder, clamp him tight, leave nothing loose; for he is wondrously clever at finding a way even out of desperate straits.
Hephaestus
  1. This arm, at least, is fixed permanently.
Power
  1. Now rivet this one too and securely, so that he may learn, for all his cleverness, that he is a fool compared to Zeus.
Hephaestus
  1. None but he could justly blame my work.
Power
  1. Now drive the adamantine wedge’s stubborn edge straight
  2. through his chest with your full force.
Hephaestus
  1. Alas, Prometheus, I groan for your sufferings.
Power
  1. What! Shrinking again and groaning over the enemies of Zeus? Take care, so that the day does not come when you shall grieve for yourself.
Hephaestus
  1. You see a spectacle grievous for eyes to behold.
Power
  1. I see this man getting his deserts. Come, cast the girths about his sides.
Hephaestus
  1. I must do this; spare me your needless ordering.
Power
  1. Indeed, I’ll order you, yes and more—I’ll hound you on. Get down below, and ring his legs by force.
Hephaestus
  1. There now! The work’s done and without much labor.
Power
  1. Now hammer the piercing fetters with your full force; for the appraiser of our work is severe.
Hephaestus
  1. The utterance of your tongue matches your looks.
Power
  1. Be softhearted then,