Philoctetes

Sophocles

Sophocles, creator; Sophocles the plays and fragments with critical notes, commentary, and translation in English prose Part 4 The Philoctetes; Jebb, Richard Claverhouse, Sir, 1841-1905, editor, translator. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1898.

  1. and sail from this land with me, your friend.
Philoctetes
  1. What! To the plains of Troy and to the abhorred son of Atreus, with this miserable foot?
Neoptolemus
  1. No, rather to those who will free you and your pus-filled limb from pain, and will save you from your sickness.
Philoctetes
  1. You giver of frightening advice, what have you said?
Neoptolemus
  1. I recognize what will be best in the end for you and for me.
Philoctetes
  1. Have you no shame before the gods for saying that?
Neoptolemus
  1. Why should a man be ashamed of benefiting his friends?
Philoctetes
  1. Do you mean a benefit to the Atreids, or for me?
Neoptolemus
  1. For you, certainly, since I am your friend and speak in friendship.
Philoctetes
  1. How can that be, when you would give me up to my enemies?
Neoptolemus
  1. Please, sir, learn to be less defiant in misfortune.
Philoctetes
  1. You will ruin me—I know it—with these words.
Neoptolemus
  1. Not I. But you, I say, will not understand.
Philoctetes
  1. Do I not know already that the Atreids cast me away?
Neoptolemus
  1. They cast you out, yes, but look if they will not in turn restore you.
Philoctetes
  1. Never—if I must first consent to see Troy.
Neoptolemus
  1. What can I do, then if my pleading fails to persuade you of anything that I recommend?
  2. The easiest course for me is to stop talking, and for you to live, just as you do now, without deliverance.
Philoctetes
  1. Let me bear the sufferings that are fated me. But what you promised me with your right hand in mine—to bring me home,—that promise fulfil for me, son,
  2. and do not delay, or remind me further of Troy. I have had my fill of grief and lamentations.