Rhesus

Euripides

Euripides. The Plays of Euripides, Translated into English Prose from the Text of Paley. Vol. I. Coleridge, Edward P., translator. London: George Bell and Sons, 1906.

  1. If however you should rouse them, do you know their password?
Diomedes
  1. Yes, it is “Phoebus”; I heard Dolon use it.
Odysseus
  1. Ah! I see the enemy have left this bivouac.
Diomedes
  1. Yet Dolon surely said that here was Hector’s couch, against whom this sword of mine is drawn.
Odysseus
  1. What can it mean? Has his company withdrawn elsewhere?
Diomedes
  1. Perhaps to form some stratagem against us.
Odysseus
  1. Yes, for Hector is bold now, by reason of his victory, bold.
Diomedes
  1. What then are we to do, Odysseus? We have not found the man asleep; our hopes are dashed.
Odysseus
  1. Let us go to the fleet with what speed we may. Some god, whichever it be that gives him his good luck, is preserving him; against fate we must not strive.
Diomedes
  1. Then should we two not go against Aeneas or Paris, most hateful of Phrygians, and with our swords cut off their heads?
Odysseus
  1. Well, how in the darkness can you find them among a hostile army, and slay them without risk?
Diomedes
  1. Yet it would be shameful to go to the Argive ships
  2. if we have done the enemy no harm.
Odysseus
  1. What! no harm! Have we not slain Dolon who spied upon the anchored fleet, and have we not his spoils safe here? Or do you expect to sack the entire camp?
Diomedes
  1. I agree, let us return; and good luck go with us!
Athena
  1. Where are you going, away from the Trojan ranks, with sorrow gnawing at your hearts, because the god does not grant you two to slay Hector or Paris? Have you not heard that Rhesus has come to aid Troy in no mean fashion?
  2. If he survives this night until the dawn, neither Achilles nor Aias’s spear can stop him from utterly destroying the Argive fleet, razing its palisades and carrying this the onslaught of his lance far and wide within the gates.
  3. Slay him, and all is yours; let Hector’s sleep alone, no throat-cutting slaughter; for he shall find death at another hand.
Odysseus
  1. Queen Athena, it is the well-known accent of your voice I hear; for you are always
  2. at my side to help me in my toil. Tell us where that man lies asleep; in what part of the barbarian army is he stationed?