History of the Peloponnesian War

Thucydides

Thucydides. The Peloponnesian War. London, J. M. Dent; New York, E. P. Dutton. 1910.

The treaty and above alliance concluded, each party at once released everything whether acquired by war or otherwise, and thenceforth acting in common voted to receive neither herald nor embassy from the Athenians unless they evacuated their forts and withdrew from Peloponnese, and also to make neither peace nor war with any, except jointly.

Zeal was not wanting: both parties sent envoys to the Thracian places and to Perdiccas, and persuaded the latter to join their league.

Still he did not at once break off from Athens, although minded to do so upon seeing the way shown him by Argos, the original home of his family.

They also renewed their old oaths with the Chalcidians and took new ones:

the Argives, besides, sent ambassadors to the Athenians, bidding them evacuate the fort at Epidaurus.

The Athenians, seeing their own men outnumbered by the rest of the garrison, sent Demosthenes to bring them out.

This general, under color of a gymnastic contest which he arranged on his arrival, got the rest of the garrison out of the place, and shut the gates behind them.

Afterwards the Athenians renewed their treaty with the Epidaurians, and by themselves gave up the fortress.