History of the Peloponnesian War

Thucydides

Thucydides. The Peloponnesian War. London, J. M. Dent; New York, E. P. Dutton. 1910.

After holding on for a long while without either giving way, the Athenians aided by their horse, of which the enemy had none, at length routed the Corinthians, who retired to the hill and halting remained quiet there, without coming down again.

It was in this rout of the right wing that they had the most killed, Lycophron their general being among the number.

The rest of the army, broken and put to flight in this way without being seriously pursued or hurried, retired to the high ground and there took up its position.

The Athenians, finding that the enemy no longer offered to engage them, stripped his dead and took up their own and immediately set up a trophy.

Meanwhile, the half of the Corinthians left at Cenchreae to guard against the Athenians sailing on Crommyon, although unable to see the battle for Mount Oneion, found out what was going on by the dust, and hurried up to the rescue; as did also the older Corinthians from the town, upon discovering what had occurred.

The Athenians seeing them all coming against them, and thinking that they were reinforcements from the neighbouring Peloponnesians, withdrew in haste to their ships with their spoils and their own dead, except two that they left behind, not being able to find them,

and going on board crossed over to the islands opposite, and from thence sent a herald, and took up under truce the bodies which they had left behind.

Two hundred and twelve Corinthians fell in the battle, and rather less than fifty Athenians.