History of the Peloponnesian War

Thucydides

Thucydides. The Peloponnesian War. London, J. M. Dent; New York, E. P. Dutton. 1910.

In the meantime the Mantineans and others included in the agreement went out under the pretence of gathering herbs and firewood, and stole off by twos and threes, picking on the way the things which they professed to have come out for, until they had gone some distance from Olpae, when they quickened their pace.

The Ambraciots and such of the rest as had accompanied them in larger parties, seeing them going on, pushed on in their turn, and began running in order to catch them up.

The Acarnanians at first thought that all alike were departing without permission, and began to pursue the Peloponnesians; and believing that they were being betrayed, even threw a dart or two at some of their generals who tried to stop them and told them that leave had been given.

Eventually, however, they let pass the Mantineans and Peloponnesians, and slew only the Ambraciots,

there being much dispute and difficulty in distinguishing whether a man was an Ambraciot or a Peloponnesian.

The number thus slain was about two hundred; the rest escaped into the bordering territory of , and found refuge with Salynthius, the friendly king of the Agraeans.