Iliad

Homer

Homer, creator; Butler, Samuel, 1835-1902, translator

thick as leaves or as the sands of the sea. Hektor, I charge you above all others, do as I say. There are many allies dispersed about the city of Priam from distant places and speaking divers tongues.

Therefore, let each chief give orders to his own people, setting them severally in array and leading them forth to battle." Thus she spoke, but Hektor knew that it was the goddess, and at once broke up the assembly. The men flew to arms; all the gates were opened, and the people thronged through them,

horse and foot, with the tramp as of a great multitude. Now there is a high mound before the city, rising by itself upon the plain. Men call it Batieia, but the gods know that it is the tomb [sêma] of lithe Myrrhine.

Here the Trojans and their allies divided their forces. Priam's son, great Hektor of the gleaming helmet, commanded the Trojans, and with him were arrayed by far the greater number and most valiant of those who were longing for the fray. The Dardanians were led by brave

Aeneas, whom Aphrodite bore to Anchises, when she, goddess though she was, had lain with him upon the mountain slopes of Ida. He was not alone, for with him were the two sons of Antenor, Archilokhos and Akamas, both skilled in all the arts of war. They that dwelt in Telea under the lowest spurs of Mount Ida,

men of substance, who drink the limpid waters of the Aesepos, and are of Trojan blood - these were led by Pandaros son of Lykaon, whom Apollo had taught to use the bow. They that held Adrasteia and the district [dêmos] of Apaesus, with Pityeia, and the high mountain of Tereia -

these were led by Adrastos and Amphios, whose breastplate was of linen. These were the sons of Merops of Perkote, who excelled in all kinds of divination. He told them not to take part in the war, but they gave him no heed, for fate lured them to destruction.

They that dwelt about Perkote and Praktios, with Sestos, Abydos, and Arisbe - these were led by Asios, son of Hyrtakos, a brave commander - Asios, the son of Hyrtakos, whom his powerful dark bay steeds, of the breed that comes from the river Selleis, had brought from Arisbe.

Hippothoos led the tribes of Pelasgian spearsmen, who dwelt in fertile Larissa - Hippothoos, and Pylaios of the race of Ares, two sons of the Pelasgian Lethus, son of Teutamus. Akamas and the warrior Peirous commanded the Thracians

and those that came from beyond the mighty stream of the Hellespont. Euphemos, son of Troizenos, the son of Ceos, was leader of the Ciconian spearsmen. Pyraikhmes led the Paeonian archers from distant Amydon, by the broad waters of the river Axios,

the fairest that flow upon the earth. The Paphlagonians were commanded by stout-hearted Pylaimenes from Enetae, where the mules run wild in herds. These were they that held Cytorus and the country round Sesamus, with the cities by the river Parthenios,

Cromna, Aigialos, and lofty Erithinoi. Odios and Epistrophos were leaders over the Halizoni from distant Alybe, where there are mines of silver. Chromis, and Ennomos the augur, led the Mysians, but his skill in augury availed not to save him from destruction,

for he fell by the hand of the fleet descendant of Aiakos in the river, where he slew others also of the Trojans. Phorkys, again, and noble Askanios led the Phrygians from the far country of Askania, and both were eager for the fray. Mesthles and Antiphos commanded the Meonians,

sons of Talaimenes, born to him of the Gygaean lake. These led the Meonians, who dwelt under Mount Tmolos. Nastes led the Carians, men of a strange speech. These held Miletus and the wooded mountain of Phthires, with the water of the river Maeander and the lofty crests of Mount Mycale.

These were commanded by Nastes and Amphimakhos, the brave sons of Nomion. He came into the fight with gold about him, like a girl; fool that he was, his gold was of no avail to save him, for he fell in the river by the hand of the fleet descendant of Aiakos,

and Achilles bore away his gold. Sarpedon and Glaukos led the Lycians from their distant land, by the eddying waters of the Xanthos.