History of the Peloponnesian War

Thucydides

Thucydides. The Peloponnesian War. London, J. M. Dent; New York, E. P. Dutton. 1910.

The above-mentioned conduct, coming to the ears of the Lacedaemonians, occasioned his first recall.

And after his second voyage out in the ship of Hermione, without their orders, he gave proofs of similar behavior.

Besieged and expelled from Byzantium by the Athenians, he did not return to Sparta; but news came that he had settled at Colonae in the Troad, and was intriguing with the barbarians, and that his stay there was for no good purpose; and the Ephors, now no longer hesitating, sent him a herald and a scytale with orders to accompany the herald or be declared a public enemy.

Anxious above everything to avoid suspicion, and confident that he could quash the charge by means of money, he returned a second time to Sparta.

At first thrown into prison by the Ephors (whose powers enable them to do this to the king), he soon compromised the matter and came out again, and offered himself for trial to any who wished to institute an inquiry concerning him.