History of the Peloponnesian War

Thucydides

Thucydides. The Peloponnesian War. London, J. M. Dent; New York, E. P. Dutton. 1910.

After entering the Megarid and cutting down the fruit trees, the Lacedaemonians returned home across Geraneia and the isthmus.

Sixty-two days after the battle the Athenians marched into Boeotia under the command of Myronides,

defeated the Boeotians in battle at Oenophyta, and became masters of Boeotia and Phocis.

They dismantled the walls of the Tanagraeans, took a hundred of the richest men of the Opuntian Locrians as hostages, and finished their own long walls.

This was followed by the surrender of the Aeginetans to Athens on conditions; they pulled down their walls, gave up their ships, and agreed to pay tribute in future.

The Athenians sailed round Peloponnese under Tolmides, son of Tolmaeus, burnt the arsenal of Lacedaemon, took Chalcis, a town of the Corinthians, and in a descent upon Sicyon defeated the Sicyonians in battle.